Bill,

Thanks for the suggestion but it doesn't sound like the one I'm looking for, at least not by the cover. Also, the Croy book is translated from German and I didn't get a sense that the book I'm after was translated. And, it had an earlier feel to it.

Do you think the Croy book is worthwhile? I see he wrote other books an "Camera Trickery," etc., and that doesn't sound like something the author I'm looking for would be writing. But, it's cheap enough for me to order a copy if you think its worth having.

Most of the portrait books I've seen seem written in reverse. What I mean by that is the photographer has taken a picture and then decides to do a lighting diagram and discuss some technical aspects (e.g., strobe brand, wattage and gels) briefly after the fact. And there's usually a celebrity or some flashy fashion model involved, haute couture, and affected expression. Sometimes glitter or sequins too.

Conversely, the book I'm looking for would describe a situation and how to solve a specific problem or problems IIRC. Like, an older gentleman with a broken nose, double chin, overweight, wearing glasses, and balding comes to the studio for a sitting. Instructions would then be proffered to seat him in a chair with shoulders 45 degrees from the lens axis, oriented so when he turns his head towards the camera the broken nose appears straighter. Use that pose and short lighting to minimize his weight, have the forward foot on a slightly raised platform and the other on the floor. With his same side hand on the forward knee have him lean forward to shift his weight to that side with the other hand on his hip. No hairlight and camera from a straight on position, neither raised nor lowered with a scrim to block light from the forehead, and tilt the chin downward slightly. Remove the lenses from the glasses if there is a reflection than cannot be eliminated otherwise. All that kind of stuff anticipating a specific result, not reporting on it after the fact. Know what I mean Vern? That Joe Zeltsman website comes close to the approach of the book I'm after.