Double-X is a cinema negative film that is expected to be printed through several generations before it goes to the final theater print. It has lower inherent contrast than still films to offset the higher contrast of the release print positive film as well as the contrast gained by each printing generation. In my experience, it captures more shadow detail with exceptional mid-tones. It is an older style film that has a different grain appearance when compared with modern films like NeoPan 400, Tri-X, or HP-5.

Most of the time I rate it at EI 250 and use Microdol 1+1 or 1+3. It also produces fine results at EI 400 in Ilford DD-X.

Here are some examples:

EI 250 in Microdol 1+1
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/arcata/h1e9fd4b#h1e9fd4b

EI 400 in Ilford DD-X 1+4
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/arcata/h2626f9d0#h2626f9d0

EI 250 in Microdol 1+1
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/crossro...e51f3#heee51f3

EI 250 in Microdol 1+3
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/tanzani...cea7#h2cd2cea7

EI 250 in Microdol 1+1
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/napoli/h14201884#h14201884
All the images in the Naples gallery are Double-X in Microdol

All the B&W images in the Pompei gallery are Double-X in Microdol 1+1
http://gascherb.zenfolio.com/pompei

Microdol 1+1 softens the grain and makes for better scans with my equipment. DD-X provides a bit more speed, but the grain becomes more prominent.


Double-X is may favorite general-purpose film. It captures a beautiful grey scale and retains detail in both the shadows and highlights, even with scenes that contain a wide brightness range.

Glenn