Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post
Why ask him to update his terminology when you are merely voicing an opinion which is not really fact altogether?

First off, if you think that the term "Fine Art Photography" has been swallowed up into the nauseating abyss of amateur online digital work, you would be incorrect and probably spend too much time online. You need to go to good galleries who show good work in towns that have a more cultured approach to representing art and art history, NY, Paris, London, Prague, LA, Sante Fe and even lil' ol' Aspen...

Secondly, you are thinking of digital photography from a photographer's perspective, not a consumer or educated art aficionado perspective. The reason this is important to consider is that nothing is more over hyped and over-promoted and self serving as the internet / digital age. I read two stories on the AP wire that had nothing to do with technology and yet, the writer had to be sure and beat me over the head with how many hits, tweets and views a story topic had in social media....technology loves to talk about it self and make you believe that is all there is...I call it the "TMZ" effect...

So if the public is getting their head beaten in by all the new hype, then everyone, even the people who promote the hype need a break. They need tactility, a shower, food, love, a walk, fresh air....or they need to go lose them self in staring at giant paintings in the Louvre for awhile. In short, they need to feed upon something that is not derived of a computer...or a computer camera or print for that matter as in this case.

Simply put, people know how the world now works, there is the computer and then there is everything else that is not a computer...

It's all too easy for photo-centric circles to get lost in the technology versus value versus which is better arguments. So it is also easy to lose sight of the fact that even though there are many opinions to the contrary, smart self educating people who would most likely be your customer simply know better when it comes to what is hand made and what is not.....they want to know so they find the answers...

It does not matter at this point how good digital anything gets, it is still not hand made in the sense of the term that most people relate to. That genie is out of the bottle, everyone knows how easy it is to mass produce so called "Art" on a computer.....no matter how much time *you* might have spent in front of the computer...it still was made on a computer, period. Maybe if this astounding technology were used in say, 1975 and no one else was using it on their laptop and even their phones, it might be viewed differently by the art world and the consumer. But this is not the case, digital has both saturated it self and devalued it self very quickly...and it is still said to be just getting started, so imagine the carnage of value yet to come, yikes!

So I stand by my assertions and my own personal experience.....

If your product, any product for that matter, is truly handmade and is *exceptional* in it's level of artistic merit, well marketed and talked about, you might just do great. But with digital, there is simply no assurance of that based on the growing perceptions that the public has.

Of course it is up to us the analog shooter to educate the viewers of our work to a degree, but in some ways, the digital engine is educating people too with the now near weekly articles of the ubiquitous nature of photography and the subsequent devaluing of it in terms of pros making a living. So in some ways, the marketing of analog becoming an ever more rare and unique and a worthy art form from a gallery perspective is happening automatically....

This is a good, GOOD thing.....

Ten years from now, the notion of handmade compared to computer made will astound you in what it will have done to the public's perception or art and music...it is already happening...but man, you have not seen anything yet.....
AMEN!