The saddest part of this whole story is that important machinery is functional. Or, to expand on it, it's as functional as it was for the past ten years, since their move from the original plant right across the street (now a cement factory). Which means, with glitches, but good enough to coat and cut films and papers many of you have used and still use. It's the facilities, which are literally - and obviously - falling apart. A portion of the roof collapsed during coating. There was no damage to the machine, but basic working conditions can't be met anymore - total darkness, proper ventilation and safety being just a few. And the building is owned by someone else, who doesn't care much about the whole shebang and wants them out. So the company owner, Josip Ćuk (pronounced "tchuke" as in "fluke"), stopped all production on June 15th last year and them entity named "Fotokemika Nova" is currently being liquidated. The two women in the picture are a granddaughter and a daughter of two former employees of the company. They're fighting to have the machines saved from scrap and hope to get museums in the Netherlands and Croatia show enough interest and actually do save the machinery. Thankfully, they have full support of Ćuk, an employee of Fotokemika since the late eighties, who will gladly donate the machines to them. The big white-on-black title reads: "I sold two machines to scrap and got $2600 for them, admits the owner". However, he explains in the text that these were out of function for years (packaging finalization devices). So not all is completely lost yet...