Whoa!

To the OP (mporter012).

I definitely wouldn't suggest starting with Zone system developing controls if you have never developed film before.

It isn't a bad idea to read some of this sort of stuff, but I would hold off of applying most of it until you have a bit of experience.

The two things to understand most clearly are that:

1) by controlling exposure, you control the most important variable that is most easily modified by you; and
2) past a certain minimum point, changes in development only really change contrast.

When you use a snow scene as an example, the biggest challenge is determining the exposure. A standard, reflected light meter will get fooled by snow, and will try to convince you to set an exposure that will result in a middle gray result. The suggestion that you give the scene two extra stops of exposure will help you turn the snow back to white.

By itself, snow in itself won't mean that you need to adjust development. You only need to adjust development (N -1, N, N +1) if you need to adjust contrast. A snow scene might lead to a need for that, because:

a) a brightly lit snow scene will generally have a very wide range of tones, and be very contrasty. A development time that tends to lower contrast (N - 1) would most likely help, but regular development (N) plus printing controls will come close; or
b) a cloudy and misty and snowy day will generally have a very narrow range of tones, and be very low in contrast. A development time that tends to increase contrast (N + 1) would most likely help, but regular development (N) plus printing controls will come close.

Although there certainly is some relationship between the two, it is probably best to deal with exposure issues separately from development issues.

But most important - have fun!