Quote Originally Posted by FingerLakesMark View Post
I just recently acquired a free darkroom (really old stuff, but everything seems functional).
Lucky dog. Welcome back to the world of film photography!

Quote Originally Posted by FingerLakesMark View Post
Then I made a test strip and then the print I've attached. It's quite muddy. Does anyone have any advice?
As stated in other replies, go for a harder contrast. If you don't have a set of VC filters, you should get a set soon. For what it's worth, my VC filtration solution is a set of Beseler color correcting filters I got off eBay some time ago. More magenta means more contrast (harder/higher grade), white means about a 2 to 2 grade depending on paper (way too flat for my tastes), and more yellow means less contrast (softer/lower grade). The high-contrast emulsion is blue-sensitive, and the low-contrast emulsion is green-sensitive.

Quote Originally Posted by FingerLakesMark View Post
Perhaps it's my safelight (I used the red led on one of those headlamps that you can buy at Walmart).
Spend a few bucks on a Delta 1 Brightlab or similar. I've heard it said in other locations here that a red LED doesn't have spectral purity and requires extra filtration to remove the blue/green components. I use the Delta 1 Brightlab 11w unit, bare, pointing into the upper corner of a white-painted room. I get good overall illumination and don't seem to have fogging issues with Fomaspeed Variant 311 paper. I once purchased an OC filtered safelight and was underwhelmed with its illuminating power.

Quote Originally Posted by FingerLakesMark View Post
I'm using Kodak chemicals i.e. D76 & Dektol
Good place to start. When I returned to film, I went with Ilford chemistry because I could get it in liquid form and it seemed more economical. Prior to that, I had always printed with Dektol. I used Microdol-X for my first foray into film developing back in my early teen years, but find D76 to be a good all-around film developer.