Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
As far as the sun, thanks for the eyeball advice, I WAS aware of this, but it's always a smart thing to include the info just in case.
Sun light normally blinds you so you turn your eyes away as quickly as you can, or you close you lids. Once you put an IR filter between the sun and your eyes, that natural reflex stops working, it looks dark after all. But the strong IR light is still there, frying your eyes.
Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
It's all just an idea, I just can't imagine that there isn't an adapter for the RZ series or that one couldn't be made.
There are a few things which make it quite unfeasible to mount an RZ67 to a telescope. First, you have a crop factor of about 0.5 compared to 35mm, and it already takes 1000-1500mm focal length to fill the frame with sun or moon on 35mm. Next thing is the shutter of your RZ67 sits in the lens, so apart from physically fitting a telescope to your camera you'd have to give it a shutter and control this shutter with the electronic signals coming from your RZ67. Also note that most telescopes are mounted such that they track the movement of stars, which means a heavy camera like the RZ67 is not something you want attached at the end of your telescope.
Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
That's why Ansel got such a good image of that field and barn, I forget the name, but he was out and the sun went down and moon came up, and he couldn't measure anything, but remembered the lumens of the moon or something and calculated the proper exposure in his head and got a fantastic image with the foreground and moon both exposed properly.
Ansel Adams was a true master of the dark room. His shot "Moonrise, Hernandez" is paramount to that. He needed intensifier to make the neg work, which tells me it was underexposed. Not bad for an estimate but no magic either.