Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
Thank you. I'd have rather not followed the link to see for myself. (but I did) Too much information; I'm on information overload here. I'm craving credibility. I'm a procedural thinker and do-er more in the form of PE the EK man. I'm a guy who read and followed published Kodak instructions as fastidiously as the Kodak guy with the clipboard in the Kodak paper sample swatch books when I was a teenager in the 70's. And it always seemed to work when my equipment was dependable. But it sure would be nice now that those days are gone to just be lazy and expect a good picture from any jiunk film I get my hands on these days. In other words, I might actually buy another bottle after 40 years and give it a go. I'm just too old to waste my time and money burning gas to go out on a picture expedition and end up with some crazy experiment that makes nightmares at the enlarger. Thanks again.
There will be many opinions on GRAIN ...

I think the 1:100 stand development DOES produce a lot more grain, but then I've only used it on C-41 films ...

Naocronym... you should become a subscriber, then you could view my gallery, a bunch of my images were shot and developed in Rodinal recently. I don't like posting my images on the public side much, I've already found stolen images in other places recently and kind of annoyed me and made me a paranoid idiot. However for the C-41 in Rodinal thread... go here...

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum42/1...chemistry.html

Look at post #8 for results ...

As far as Rodinal on actual B&W films ... I want to point out something obvious no one is talking about... it depends on the format... I really only shoot 120 in 6x6/6x7 format... I don't shoot 645 at all and 35mm rarely... (however the link above... that's all 35mm). and the grain difference between 35mm and 120 is a big difference, and the grain difference between 120 and the link the previous poster showed you with images that were 4x5 or 5x7... well of course there's little grain to be seen, but that's deceiving.

After listening to one of the more famous photographers on here, at first I didn't like what he said which was to change my agitation technique, and then, I decided to compromise, and he was right, or I was partially right and he was partially right, anyway what I do now ... Rodinal 1:50 agitate the first minute VERY gently, not fast but slow and then every minute thereafter only 2 inversions and again really gentile inversions, it made the images look much smoother and helped with grain too, I don't know why, but it did. I used to like to hear the splash/splooosh sound as the water funneled when I flipped it, I liked knowing it was flowing, but now I've learned I get better results with less agitation and slower agitation, seems to make a HUGE difference. (however I still bang my tank just as hard to dislodge bubbles (3 times in a row ever inversion cycle).

This is certainly information overload but I wanted to be thorough since you're hesitant. I do have to say I really only used Rodinal in the finer grained films, the only non fine grain film I used it in was HP5+ and even that wasn't really so bad... the massive dev chart is a bit off in the Rodinal department, I always add one minute to the time, but again, that's my style for the look I enjoy.

wish you could see my gallery... fine here...

Efke100, HP5+, Tmax400, Acros100 all in Rodinal 1:50