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Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
Can you simplify your question?
If I could break it down, I would. Sorry

Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
So, the question you need to answer is "can you find and get access to a market that is willing and able to buy your prints at a profitable price?"
When you can answer yes, sure you can make money.
I guess it's the point here. Thanks for this simple (yet very effective) explanation, even though it leaves me in the dark, at least I know there's a point trying.
What I'm interested in mostly, is buyer's perspective. What market may or will demand.

Quote Originally Posted by thegman View Post
For "industry", I would imagine it varies wildly. Some publications are happy use to mobile phone photos, and some will demand perfection, and there will be everything in between.
One deal is "lemme put your shots in our mag", but it's another when you hear "We'd like to purchase your photos from this two sessions. Please provide us with three full resolution unretouched samples to evaluate". What I was asking for is an advice how not to screw the second situation ahead of the time. of course "it depends", but are there any things to keep in mind all the time? How to make such a situation happen in the first place? Looks like after 10 or 15 years of digital revolution it's not easy already.

Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
Few commercial photographers shot 35mm, in fact those I knew didn't own any 35mm cameras. 35mm was mainly used professionally by newspaper photographers and amateurs.
(...)
That was then, now it's very different, some of the work I do can't easily be done on film - the specialist films went a few years ago (and I don't want to experiment again). Clients want digital files quickly, no delays while negataives are processed and scanned, and I always do my own processing and after shooting a rock concert would do a C41 and E6 run the next day. There's a lot of work involved and that cuts potential earnings. So in my case I decided if they need fast digital results then an all digital work flow was the best option.

That leaves more time for shooting personal work and some commercial work on film, and I much prefer film.

Ian
That doesn't sound optimistic at all. But I admire your honesty here. There are times where trying harder simply can't be good enough, this is how I understand it.
I've got a reply to the other thread I've started, asking for an FSU rangefinder selection - not for serious work, for making my romantic art. And I got a reply there to get my hands on 4x5 camera first. Now I see the point (and I think I could make a camera like that myself, what an adventure it would be!).


desertratt
I get the point. I have no troubles making big prints out of compact cameras myself. No one buys it, cause I haven't tried to sell it. What are your arguments for using film, i mean in detail? Where you see this "step up"? In quality? I guess it's not ease of cooperation with modern photo printing services.

Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
When you're stuck with lemons, sell lemonade.

What a brilliant point here!

Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
Work within your capacity and understanding for shooting quality work and you never know, people may take a shine to you and actually buy it.
There's an article here on APUG, full of clever sentences, and there's one about luck there.
http://www.apug.org/forums/forum220/...ographers.html
Know your stuff. Luck is a nice thing, but a terrifying thing to rely on. Itís like money; you only have it when you donít need it.
Thanks for yet another real life example. I can see, that geting serious with photography (unlike mural painting, for example, a thing I did while ago as well) requires expensive, modern equipment, at least most of the time. 45k USD is over 15 years of my current salary (just what I've got myself into...). I could work some more, or say "bye bye" to PhD - making it is a lose-lose situation anyway.
I'm also starting to see, that there's little I don't know already to avoid. And "do's" are medium and large format, which are really expensive to start with and, with 4x5, really expensive to, hmm, "shoot", or rather "work with".

Thank you all for your input!