Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
I agree with h.v.

The street photography I did in Dublin, look at them today, they tells me more about the Irish fashion, behaviour, look, tradition, street atmosphere and feelings than any photograph I look at the news. And I didn't do it on purpose. I just photograph people and scenes that catches my attention. Therefore, forbidding street photography is a big loss.

As I said before, because of the culture people easily feel molested for any reason.
When I see somebody falling or carrying heave things I usually offer my help. Despite my generosity they behave as if they are feeling molested. Sometimes they even ignore me as if they can't see or hear me. It does't mean that I will not be kind with people any more. If I see they don't want my help I go away.

The same with photography. If they are not doing anything wrong, embarrassing, or too intimate in the streets, there is no reason to feel molested or shamed. But if I see that the person looks annoyed with my lens towards them, I look for other person to photograph. Not a big deal.
That's weird. But goes in line with my thought of taking ourselves too seriously. Things like that don't happen in North America often (if it does happen, you just brush it off), but I know obviously there is a difference between Europe and North America. If people feel that threatened by street photography, that's their problem, not mine. I know I'm not doing anything wrong, and that's what matters.