Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
Getting the box light-tight isn't so hard (rubber weather strips on the door with a strong latch to compress them slightly and matte-black folded air-flow manifolds*) but how do you get the plates in there without exposing them? Do you need some means of putting a holder in and manipulating it through sleeves or something?

Edit: now I assume you mean you're pouring dry plates rather than doing something with a freshly exposed (wet?) plate. I assume that if you can load the drying cabinet in a darkroom (wherever plates were poured), close the door and put the lights on then that's OK?

My dryer (film) is a tall wooden box with car engine air filter at top, bathroom exhaust fan above that pushing air down and a bunch of holes in the bottom. An extra couple of baffles would make it light-tight.

* Think of the air taking a path through 3-4 S- bends, all with matte black paint or flocking. If it's the simple box-construction, this means just putting in a couple of baffles with notches cut from one edge/corner:

|________ |
| ________|
|________ |
| ________|

The width is about 40cm (width of cabinet) and the gaps maybe 20mm. Or use a handful of PVC stormwater elbows (diameter to match a small fan) painted black on the inside to make a set of maybe 5 U-turns.
I am going to be doing some dry plate experiments (found a few formulas for emulsions I have been wanting to try out, and have a couple I think might work), but as I do not have a dedicated darkroom that is always dark, I need a light proof box with air flow.

My plan is to use some computer fans (2 or 4), placed inside blowing air in one direction straight through. But I ran into an issue of how the moisture would escape, if I put holes in it, it will leak light and kill the plates.