Speak for yourselves but I personally strive to get the same grain one would see in a 30x40" print from 35mm in my smaller format prints...one of my favorite photographs I've ever seen on display was by a photographer whose name I don't even know, in Finland (god knows if he was even Finnish or not), and it was a very simple portrait of a woman, maybe in her early 30s...very attractive...

Anyway, it was a 16x20" or so, maybe a 20x24 but grain was what I can only describe as sandpapery. It was articulated so well and it almost seemed like a layer of sand had been lightly spread over the entire image...I've never seen grain quite like it since. It was a very low contrast print, but the tones were beautifully distributed...just an incredible photograph...the woman's face seemed to melt into the background, much more gently than blowing out the tones on the face to match a paper white background...this was via careful dodging I suspect. Without the grain, the photograph would have seemed artificial and manufactured, the grain reminded you as a viewer that this was a real human being you were looking at.

That said, people who print no larger than 11x14 from medium format confused the heck out of me...my 30x30" prints from 6x6cm negs are enjoyable up close, and far away, that goes for both recent traditional gelatin silver prints, and the Lambda prints I had done from some color negs a couple years ago. Very sharp, very good contrast...

The harder parts of making a large print from 35mm are having a critically aligned enlarger, a good neg carrier, and holding the paper flat. As Bob Carnie can attest, keeping the paper flat is a cinch if you use a simple, yet effective magnet/brace setup, or as the more fortunate of the community, a vacuum easel. Substitute "glass" for "good" on the carrier, and that problem is easily solved if you are meticulous about keeping things clean, and if you don't have the tools to align your enlarger critically, find the nearest rental darkroom capable of making large photographic prints, and use that...the good ones will have flawlessly maintained equipment (CRC and Printspace NYC both come to mind).

The hardest thing about making large prints is handling a piece of paper inundated with chemicals in trays that are just barely big enough for it, and avoiding crinkles.

If you can avoid crinkles, go for it.