This might be of some interest to one or two people here-



C11.17 prototype at Shiprock NM by joseph - jb7, on Flickr


Taking the first picture on the new (prototype) Carbon Fiber and Walnut packet loading multi format 11x17 folding studio camera at Shiprock, New Mexico at dawn yesterday. Desert testing. Didn't go too badly, got some valuable feedback from the exercise. Loaded with 11x17 Kodak X-ray film. The camera was designed to take advantage of the image circle of a lens, to shoot 11x14 and 7x17 without reducing backs. An interesting side effect is the aggregate format, 11x17, which is easily cut down from 14x17...
The smallest size you might consider using on it might be 8x10, perhaps to shoot the odd sheet of colour film on your holidays, for example. Though I forgot to pack the little bit I have...

11x17 Folding studio camera? Does that sound a bit odd? Did any studio camera fold? This one has been designed to accept heavy lenses, although it hasn't been tested with one yet. I have placed a 9.25kg 36" f/6.3 at the end of the front extension without appreciable deflection, though I haven't mounted it on a lens board yet - a 9" board, Century size. I have one waiting for it, that Eddie Gunks very generously donated to the project last year, in New York.

The camera has front tilt and swing which can be controlled from behind the back, although with a lens that heavy, I think only downward tilt will be available, if any. I'll be back in Dublin in a couple of weeks and will try it out then-

It has an integral dark cloth, suspended from a closing lid which is necessary for shutting off the back of the camera while making an exposure; the focusing screen must be displaced to allow the film holder to register.

Bellows, up to 43 inches available on accessory rear extended tubes, around 36" in this configuration. I should be able to use a 90mm for circular images too, on the recessed board in the picture- though movements are restricted below about 250mm-

Anyway, first look, a lot of testing to be done yet, although the film loading into the camera has passed with flying colours. The camera was designed and built in Ireland, but desert testing has shown up some shortcomings in some of the materials and adhesives used- I just wouldn't have appreciated how cruel the sun can be outside of our temperate little isle...