Looking through some old Kodak formulary booklets my father has. These formulas are from a 1944 booklet which seems to be from the Kodak Research Laboratories in the U.K.

D-158 "Velox"

Described as a developer to produce blue-black tones on Velox and other "gaslight" papers. I believe Velox paper inherently tended toward cold/blue-black tones, but maybe this may still be worth trying with current papers (as it is similar to D-72 and not an exotic formula), perhaps adding some Benzotriazole for additional restraint if fogging occurs. Superficially it appears to be a slightly more active version of D-72 with less bromide.

3.2g Elon* (Metol)
50.0g Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)
13.3g Hydroquinone
69.0g Sodium Carbonate (anhydrous)
0.9g Potassium Bromide
-----
1L

Instructions were to dilute 1+1, with development times of 30-40s at 65F (18C).

*Interestingly Kodak actually describes Elon as "a specially purified form of monomethyl p-aminophenol sulfate and is also known under other trade names, such as "Metol", "Genol", etc.". I read this to mean Elon, Metol, etc. are all specially purified forms of the compound. So I'm not sure there is anything special about Elon per se.

D-173

Described as a substitute for D-158 without Elon for people "suffering from Metol dermatitis". I find this a little confusing since my understanding is the allergic reaction to Metol is due to an impurity, but Metol (or at least Elon) is supposed to be highly purified as per Kodak's definition (above). In any case...

22.5g Sodium Sulfite (anhydrous)
65.0g Sodium Carbonate (anhydrous)
0.375g p-Aminophenol Hydrochloride
7.5g Hydroquinone
0.15g Potassium Bromide
------
1L

Instructions were to dilute 1+1, with development times of 35-45s at 65F (18C).