Quote Originally Posted by Robert Kennedy
Like I said though, caveat emptor becomes difficult when they give inkjets names like "Platinum".
yeah--sure--forgive me here, but people are stupid....what else is new?

there's a c-paper on the market called a "sepia" print. polaroid makes a "sepia" film. manufactuers make storage sleeves that can stick to your film and still call them "archival". or..how about ads in photo magazines using public domain photos for stock? yeah, sure go ahead and order it from them & pay a usage fee! you can only get it for free from the Library of Congress and almost every archive in this country...

you could go on & on & on &....back to the beginning of photography. take daguerrotypes- they used to take tintypes--ferrotypes--and put them in Union cases--to sorta spruce them up --making them look like the more expensive dageurrotypes or ambrotypes. now, it's not unusual to find a tintype in a case, being sold as an ambrotype, just out of ignorance or some unscrupulous dealer....

Or frontier prints and lightjets? You'd be hard put to argue that an optically made print was somehow more longer lasting than one made on a Lightjet or a Lambda. If anything, this is the best digital/trad. output material there is. If you had to purchase a digital print from someone, and you were worried about it--you could do much, much worse than this.

The National Archives uses Lightjets for some of their work--check out their traveling exhibit, "Pictures of the Century". This was done on b&w rc paper on a Lightjet. The patron prints they sell are made by a group of contract vendors--almost every one of them uses Frontier prints. . The last update I read from Wilhelm for his book--he recommended c-papers like Crystal Archive over *any* b&w rc paper on the market.

My point is that things change. What was considered to be an unstable type of material, has now matured into a choice for some--could be the same for inkjets someday. I know another museum that sells inkjets to patrons as a cheap alternative to a regular print. They also use Pictro prints and dye subs. With the inkjets--they have a disclaimer that says the prints are non-permanent. I don't really have a problem with this--they have a whole scale of repro services, and this is on the bottom...it's the same reasoning for the prints we make on RC paper. I looked at a spreadsheet of materials the system I work for ordered last year. There was almost 20-25 times the amount of RC paper compared to fiber base. Things change.....

But platinum inkjets? whatever....it's just a marketing word. You would never be able to get the manufactuers to agree to a enforceable designation if they can't even come up with a standard test to TEST the products against in the first place.....


KT

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