Steve,

</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Steve Hamley @ Nov 21 2002, 01:18 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>The reason the back is attracting such attention is that is the first affordable way to get into 617 unless you crop 5x7, and unlike 612, the first practical way to carry 4x5 and 617 capability together.</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>

I was actually not aware that this is a back for a 4x5 (makes me wonder this can work). I always thought it would be designed for international 5x7 backs.

</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Steve Hamley @ Nov 21 2002, 01:18 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I&#39;m not really sure the format is more situation dependent, and this is a very thought provoking comment. I think the format is better suited to different compositions, but whether those compositions are more or less frequent is probably in the mind of the photographer.</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>

I agree. I would even agree that our visual perception of scenic views is basically panoramic. And because of this, a photographer usually must pay special attention to the foreground. The result is a picture that presents a different view, stressing different aspects. The viewer has something to discover, he usually does not perceive on location, because of his panoramic perception. The most compelling panoramic pictures do make use of the inverse principle. In certain environments, our perception is not panoramic. Especially in more closed locations like a city or an even an interior. In these cases, a panoramic picture will open the same "different sight" to the viewer as the 1:1.3 aspect ratio would in a landscape picture.

</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Steve Hamley @ Nov 21 2002, 01:18 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>You also gain movements, no lens cost, any lens works that did before</td></tr></table><span id='postcolor'>

I do not agree in this point. The movements are still limited by the mechanical capabilities of the camera. And if you really intent to crop a 5x7 to a panoramic format, you may ignore any vignetting outside the assumed frame.


Thank you for your interesting comments.