Daniel,

I agree to keep an eye open for a press, but if all else fails...

I used to dry mount all the time with a household iron and I tried it again last year just for fun. It does work, but requires a technique wich must be learned through practice and observation.

The three most important issues are:

A really good, flat, hard surface to work on. Andything that flexes won't work...
The right temperature on the iron.
The right pressure and speed.

As I remember, 'high' would be way too hot and you have a good chance of buring the print. Try medium. Move slow with quite a bit of pressure, and keep the pressure consistent. Keep moving. Don't let the iron sit in one spot. Move from the center area out towards the edges. this help eliminate bubbles. Never move from an edge towards the center. This will cause a bubble and possible crease the print.

If the print lifts off the mat, there's two probable reasons. Not enough heat/time/pressure. Or too much heat and the adhesive stayed hot too long after you moved the iron away. A surface that flexes will also cause the print to lift because of the curving that make the print and mat different sizes when pressed down.

The only problems I ever had with the iron technique was getting the very edges flat. It really helps to start with a very flat print.

All it takes is practice and paying attention to what the print/adhesive does while you're working it. To learn, it also helps to work on a junk print and even not trim the adhesive sheet. With a tiny bit sticking out of the sides of the print, you can judge how well it's melting with your iron passes...

Good luck with it...