What's good paper or bad paper depends hugely on the kind of negative film, developer, viewing condition, etc. and it's hard to make one dimensional evaluation. Also, desirable shadow contrast is hugely dependent on the viewing condition. If you view the print with rather dim gallery lighting condition, you'll have better luck with lower shadow contrast with paper with shoulder. But more crisp version will look better if the viewing light level is higher. Of course, a good printer should have a standard viewing light adjusted for average gallery condition to evaluate test prints while in the darkroom. (Unfortunately, gallery condition also varies a lot, but you'll have to set a standard somewhere.)

Then another concern is print drydown. Most modern papers don't show as much drydown, but prints toned in brown toner (polysulfide) or selenium sometimes quite pronounced density increase in a day after drying. This should be factored in when printing...

By now the topic digressed but then none of the related considerations would support the view that Dmax is that important...