</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Jan 23 2003, 07:07 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> One more thing...

This is even WORSE than not having the camera...

I was in Maine once, along the coast, at sunrise, 4x5 camera mounted and waiting and lenses all cleaned and spotless. Velvia loaded in the Polaroid holder...

The light was incredible, and then turned simply heavenly. Not jus the sky but the air itself turned lavender in one second. I was delighted...

and the holder jammed. Jammed&#33; I couldn&#39;t pull the sleeve, and I couldn&#39;t pull the sheet out of the holder. I had to just stand there 3000 miles from home, next to &#036;2,500 worth of the best 4x5 equipment, merely watching the miracle of light. And I swear I could hear someone, somewhere up in the clouds snickering...

dgh </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
What else can happen; you forget to pull the dark slide, double expose a previous beauty, or forget to load that side of the holder. You should always have back ups. Nothing is more frustrating, bush league, amateurish then missing those golden moments. We can all count those times on our hands, some on hands and feet.

In landscape photography, rarely do all the elements come together at the decisive moment. There is always some little gremlin shaking a leaf, branch, nerves, to try to make you blow the shot. Read the account of how Ansel Adams photographed the most celebrated landscape photograph in the world, "Moon Rise Hernandez." It seems he only had a matter of minutes to set up his 8X10 camera, compose, choose filter, get film holder ready, before the sun set. In the end, he could not find his exposure meter&#33; He had to rely on his experience to remember the reflectance value of the moon, and work it in with all the other variables. He was able to get off one exposure. Then within a mater of seconds, the sun light was gone before he could make a second negative.

The positive side of the matter, there is always another day.