</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Robert @ Feb 4 2003, 02:28 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Mark in SD @ Feb 4 2003, 11:49 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>

2.&nbsp; The Eruption of Vesuvius and the resulting devestation on the Roman Civilization.&nbsp; The power of the eruption, the scenes of devestation, the emotions.&nbsp; It would have made a wonderful setting.

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Pompei? It&#39;s kind of a reach to call it devasting to Roman civilization.

How about sunrise/sunset taking one holder of the building of the pyramids. Each day until it&#39;s finished. </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
It wasn&#39;t just Pompeii. Herculaneum (sp?) and the entire bay of Naples was affected. This was a thriving trade port and a popular retreat for the Romans. The eruption did have ripple effects that affected the core of the empire. Most major natural disasters has such effects back then.

However, I meant more of "how such an event affected the people of Roman times as opposed to how Mt. St. Helens or Mt. Pinatubo (sp?) affected modern people".