Quote Originally Posted by Andre R. de Avillez
Clay, thanks for the suggestions, but I would really rather not touch potassium ferracyanide. You see, I'm a clumsy guy. I lost count of how many scars I have in my body (I've had surgery on both my knees to remove scar tissue, in fact), and am still alive today by what is most likely a mix of blind luck and an on-going bet between the gods...

Potassium ferracyanide is a strong corrosive, and that really worries me. The stuff eats through metal, for crying out loud. An ex-professor of mine used to work for the Dallas Morning News, and said they had a bucket of that stuff in their gang darkroom back in the 80's. Everyweek they would need a new brush, because the metal thing that holds the bristles would be eaten all the way through...

As for the developer, I wear my gloves and hope for the best, but one risk cannot justify the other, if you know what I mean.

Could you give the URL for the web page you mentioned? My google search didn't help much (but being a sepia toner, I bet it still requires bleaching).

Les, a quick look at B&H turned up Ammonium Bromide, Potassium Bromide, and Sodium Bromide. Which one are you talking about?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=*&shs=bromide

Well, you know what you are comfortable messing with better than anyone, but if you are interested in reading a good general explanation of some various toning options, check out this link:www.wynnwhitephoto.com/toning.html . He discusses the pros and cons of the different basic toners. I have had some nice warm results using just a developer using Ansco 130 or the catechol print developer recipe from the Darkroom Cookbook. Of course all of those have stuff in them too, either glycin or catechol, that is not exactly good for you either. Seems you just can't escape from the chemistry in this hobby! But good luck to you whatever you decide to use.

Also, FWIW, the bleach that you mix up with the ferricyanide is a pretty weak solution. It is hard to imagine it eating up your sink or anything, unless you just left it there for a very long time.