Patrick;

Here are some generic examples where people discuss your advice to use volumetric measures with solids. It covers a wide range of chemicals. Also there is a quote below. If you do a search on teaspoon+gainer+photo.net you come up with pages of text with either your generic advice to use volumetric measure or others commenting on it. In my post above, I show a simple test to reveal the fallacy in that method which can yield errors of about 10% - 30% depending on crystal habit. It does not matter that I picked KBr, what matters is crystal habit. Crystalline Ascorbic Acid vs powdered Ascorbic Acid can show the same problem. It is a sad commentary on your understanding of this that you have not recognized the error in your statement regarding my use of KBr.

I would also like to add that we have had this entire fruitless discussion a year or more ago to no avail. I gave data at that time as well but it seems that it was ignored. I even pointed out that in one bottle the crystal habit can vary as the large crystals in a jar move to the top. Thus a spoonfull of a chemical can vary as you use one single bottle.


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References:

http://www.apug.org/forums/archive/i...40313-p-2.html

http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00Bfbh

http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=002bNh

Quote:

"It is easy in teaspoon measure. 2 tsp acid and 1 tsp baking soda (not powder)to the liter is close enough,......."
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As it becomes more difficult to get prepackaged processing chemistry, we must develop and foster good lab technique in those who will follow us otherwise we fail those future analog photographers.

I myself emphatically do not recommend volumetric measure of solids for serious photographic work.

PE