I'd like to address these points one by one -

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1. It is my living, and you giving or selling prints cuts into it.
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Which is why I never sell any photos I take at a wedding. I do, as I mentioned, present the B&G with a special print from me. But this in no way harms the photographer&#39;s business since it shows up a good month or more after the wedding, and they don&#39;t expect it. I can&#39;t imagine anyone refusing to pay for their wedding shoots because my single picture (sometimes a tryptych on rare occassions) fulfilled all their needs&#33; Giving a print of an image I took and that is unique to my vision won&#39;t cut in to anyone&#39;s business. Especially when it shows up well after the photographer has made his sale.

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2. I want the B&G and family to pay attention to me. If they are looking around at other photographers when I&#39;m posing or shooting, the picture quality suffers considerably.
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Very true. Personally I never shoot over the shoulder like "Uncle Al". I like to stand back and look for those moments when nobody is expecting a shot to be taken. Street style, really.

I can understand the concern though. It seems to me though that a couple of people I have seen do the formal shoots don&#39;t consider that the easiest thing to do is just plan to not have people around who can interrupt&#33;

And example -

I went to one wedding where they had planned everything out so that the photographer would take the wedding party off to a pre-determined area and shoot all the formals, etc. while everyone else was herded by the waitstaff into an area with food and drink.

In essence the B&G just disappeared. Thirty minutes later they show back up with the photographer in tow. Smart. Nobody standing behind the photographer with their Coolpix.

At other weddings I have seen the pictures take place smack dab in the middle of the damn hall&#33; I mean formals in the middle of EVERYTHING. Not very condusive to a good image. It seems to me that to do this correctly, one must ASSUME the worst of human behavior and then take the responsibility to correct for that. In other words it is not the wedding guests&#39; fault if they get in the way of a shoot that is occuring in the middle of everything. The photographer must engage in some amount of staging. Of course this does not excuse boorish behavior by anyone.

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3. At the church amateurs will step in front of me while I&#39;m trying to shoot. Shots that can&#39;t be redone.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>

I have seen that. It does suck.

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4.Time is precious and if they are posing for you, you are stealing valuable time.
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See, that statement bugs me a bit. When I shoot in the studio, I am often under similar constraints. Time can LITERALLY be money. That is why I plan ahead. It seems to me that in any situation like this, one needs to be a manager somewhat. Down to having a list of who is in what shot. It should be made clear to the B&G that they need to follow the schedule, etc. to get what they want. It is an odd situation in that you are hired to do the job, but you also have to instruct and guide your employeers&#33; Again, this issue can be avoided with some work beforehand.

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5. The B&G saw my work previously and that is why I was hired. They already know the prices and the quality. An amateur getting in the way and undercutting is hurting my business.
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Like I said before, I don&#39;t sell. I give. And I only give 1 or 3 pictures well after the job has been done.

I can understand the sentiment though. Here the wedding business seems particularly ummmmmmmmm........... insane is the only word I can think of at the moment.

It seems everyone with a digicam and a printer is jumping in. There is actually someone who has ads saying that they will do a wedding for &#036;60.00&#33;&#33;&#33;

And of course this makes anyone charging a realistic amount seem like a fraud of some sort. The average B&G are usually so swamped with bills at this point that they say "O.K." to &#036;60.00. It must be insanely tough trying to combat the "idiot newbie" factor.

Personally I refuse to shoot for anyone, but I do offer to give them some advice on choosing somebody and some questions to ask. Like what format, etc. I also tell them to expect to PAY. There are no "super deals" here. You get what you pay for. I also advise them to look for such things as samples from MULTIPLE weddings (not just one), high quality work, references, etc. It amazes me that people don&#39;t think of this on their own.