</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (gr82bart @ Mar 1 2003, 06:02 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Everyone is going digital </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
I beg to differ. Not everybody is going digital. The Pros are going digital, because it offers significant advantages for their daily business. They have specific requirements and emphases that differ from that of an amateur. The main difference is: they don&#39;t have time. They buy time with money. The amateur can save money by investing more time (and usually does). Moreover, the amateur has usually a higher quality claim than the customers of the Pro.

</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (gr82bart @ Mar 1 2003, 06:02 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Unfortunately, the only saving grace for the medium format may be significantly less expensive digital backs. Currently at the &#036;12-&#036;20k range and at only 6 mpixels they are&nbsp; priced in the stupid area. If MF digital backs were less expensive, I think more people will go MF and in turn the format itself will live.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>

Things look different for the amateur. He now gets stunning technical picture quality for a fraction of the (original) price. The MF second hand market is today better than ever. Even if digital backs get cheaper by an order of magnitude (and reach true 6x7), it is still just an alternative for someone who doesn&#39;t shot a 1000 rolls a year and not a must. Moreover, the depreciation of a second hand MF gear is for sure less than that of a comparable digital one.

And last but not least: all good things will have a revival some day.