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<td colspan="3" align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Some
history </font>



Part One


I was at one time a painter. I find myself inadvertently referring to
my photographs as paintings even though it has been almost twenty years
since I&#39;ve painted seriously. When I went to college, I went to study
painting and art history and, through an elective, discovered ceramics.
I found a second love particularly in low fire white clay bodies and various
oxidizing and oxygen reduced (Ra ku) glazes. I have always found a severe
beauty in the balance of the material, and the process when filtered through
my personal vision. In other words when my vision or idea was good and
I chose the correct materials and worked the process just right wonderful
things happened.


Part Two


I&#39;ve always taken pictures. Eventually I started to shoot things that
exceeded the capabilities of the films I used as well as the format. I
was driven to replace my 35mm with an MF camera. I could now enlarge my
images, was forced to think about film choices as well as go to pro labs
for dev. and enlargements. I&#39;m sure that the 35mm would have lasted longer
if I had switched to better films and professional processing and enlargements
sooner. I now own a 4x5 as well as a MF.


<font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Reason for
the history
</font>


I see film as a material to achieve an end. I could care less about
the politics of Fuji v. Kodak (truth be told Japanese companies can more
often then not teach their US counterparts a thing or two about being
evil). I look for film with unique character or character that I have
some empathy for and can find a place for in my toolbox/artbin. Accurate
skin tones, color fidelity and or finest grain don&#39;t necessarily rank
high with me. I also like films that will fit my work process or have
requirements that I can accommodate.


I don&#39;t have the same requirements as most. I would think I might be
more of an aberration than anything else. Meanwhile, I do my own film
processing and enlargements and I can&#39;t imagine having anyone else doing
it for me. Enlargements for obvious reasons, but even film processing
is personal. Who besides the photographer can decide if the next batch
of film requires an extra half or two thirds of a stop? I don&#39;t tray process
so I could go a step further at least with my B&W. I also prefer larger
prints so how the film holds together or how gracefully it falls apart
are important to me.


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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Film</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Description</font></td>
<td align="center" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Example</font></td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Kodak
160T
</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">This is an older emulsion with relatively large
grain. I cross process it and use it for high contrast situations where
there is strong colours or when I want a touch of punch to a low contrast
situation. The grain has an almost velveteen texture when enlarged. I rate
it at 100 with no filtration. It is a great film for night shots with strong
manmade light sources (such as neon and sodium vapor). It has very, very
good reciprocity characteristics. This film has the longest latitude of
all the films I&#39;ve crossprocessed whilst still providing some punch. It
suffers from very little colour cross over as a crossprocessed material.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">100SW</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">I cross process this film, rate it at 80 to
100 and filter it with a 30 cc Magenta filter. This film (along with its
brethren S, and SV) produces a neg with a strong green cast, has wonderful
punch, good reciprocity characteristics and I would guess about 6 stops
of latitude. The palette is very plastic in appearance, but can be unmanageable
if not filtered when shooting. The filtration also subdues the contrast.
Color crossover occurs with the shadows going magenta and mid tones going
green.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">EPP</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">I cross process and on occasion strait processes
this stuff. Cross processed the shadows go blue and the highlights yellow.
It has a very narrow latitude and some of the greatest punch of any of the
crossprocessed E6 materials I&#39;ve tried. It is great for broad daylight/mid
day light street photography. When I need a little less contrast but desire
similar punch and crossover I use EPN. I shoot it unfiltered and generally
don&#39;t use it were reciprocity failure will be an issue. I rate this film
60 -80 and on occasion shoot it with a tung filter to tame the yellows</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Portra
160nc
</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">The palette of this film is like an oil painting.
It can take an urban setting and really enhance the browns and greys it
also has excellent reciprocity characteristics. Nothing I&#39;ve used can truly
capture the dinginess of an overcast Detroit night sky like this film. Oddly,
I find it&#39;s palette too muted for people</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Portra
100T
</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">This is my favorite tung balanced film. It has
great latitude, is reasonably punchy, excellent reciprocity characteristics.
It is the film I use when I wish to manage mixed lighting. I shoot it unfiltered
and rate it just under 100.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Agfa
Ultra 50
</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">I realize this film is no longer made, but I
have 20 or so rolls left. It needs to be shot right on the money much like
a tranie, has so so reciprocity characteristics and will block-up (everywhere)
if over exposed. The palette just screams and what it does for midday sky&#39;s
is unequaled. I rate it from 50 to 100.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Fuji
Velvia
</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">This is, in my opinion, the best of the Fuji
materials for cross processing. All fuji reversal materials when crossprocessed
have a nearly uncorrectable (either when shooting or at the enlarger) limegreen
cast - purple on the neg. Velvia is the most manageable of the three. I
like to use this film for shooting flesh/people. By the time you&#39;ve tamed
the cast the midtones (read: flesh) really warms up. Oddly the latitude
of the film, when crossed, is wider than provia or astia. The reciprocity
characteristics suck making it suitable for studio or sunny days only. I
rate the film at 40 and will sometimes use either a magenta or a blue cc
filter.</td>
<td align="center" valign="top">&nbsp;</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">64T</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">This film, along with its 160T variant, can
be fun to use. They have good reciprocity characteristics, great punch and
contrast. The downside is they both suffer from a very strong cyan cast
(when crossed). I shoot it with a red cc filter at 64 (and ~120 for the
160). I have found this film to be the perfect match for metal objects (as
in cars). The palette complements the metal and the contrast enhances the
metal and chrome&#39;s reflective nature.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Reala</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">This is the leading candidate for replacing
Agfa Ultra. It has a strong palette very fine grain and extremely wide latitude.
It is a bit flat and I believe benefits from overexposure. I use it for
night shots under mixed lighting and rate it at no more than 50.</td>
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<td align="left" valign="top"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">NPC</font></td>
<td align="left" valign="top">I have come late to this film. I have been so
theroughly unimpressed with NPL and NPS, that I figured this film was no
different. I was very wrong. I haven&#39;t shot enough of it to give a good
report, but it appears to be everything PortraVC claimed to be. Great contrast,
very good punch and very easy to use. My early assessment is that the reciprocity
characteristics seem to be good and that it should be rated about 100. </td>
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