Just to keep the record "straight", the only other F stop timer I know of is the excellent one made by DA ( Darkroom Automation ). The DA F Stop Timer has been discussed here, along with the excellent timer made by RH Designs. Mr. Lindan and Dr. Ross have often contributed to the thread about F stop timers, and in general, have maintained a respectful and much appreciated collegial relationship. There are undoubtedly proponents of each timer, but upon analysis, I suspect ( not owning the RH timer does not allow me to speak with complete confidence ) that the differences between the two products are likely rather superficial in that each is capable of delivering the results promised. One is, forgive the analogy, a "Canon", and the other is a "Nikon".

If there are any other F stop timers, then I am sure the group would like to learn of them. A search of the APUG archives will allow one to learn just about all that one needs to about both of these well made products. More information can be garnered from the respective web sites.

Best of luck with which-ever of the timers one decides to use.

Ed


Quote Originally Posted by sim View Post
Hallo,

F-Stop printing treats the paper exposure in the same way as exposure with the camera is treated ie in f stops rather than pure linear times e.g. shutter speeds going up in a non-linear sequence - 1 second, 2 sec 4 sec 8 sec 16 sec rather than 1sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec etc. This does seem to be a natural way to deal with the darkroom exposure.

I have only recently bought an RH Designs Stopclock Professional, having previously done the mathematical calcualtions in my head/bit of paper for F-Stop printing - it is best not to actually think of times with the timer but densities. If a print looks too light by say half a stop, the timer will calculate the extra time needed to get an extra half stop density from the base exposure. It sounds a bit complicated but the RH Designs timer ( there may be others) takes all the headache out of the calculations - bets bit of kit I have bought.

Density starts to rule the printing process rather than times. I have found it soo much easier to concentrate on the actual print my printing is faster, better (I say so myself :-) ) and more enjoyable.

Simo.