Hello friends at APUG, it's been a while since I posted, but after spending literally hours searching online for information without much success I decided this was the place to come.

I am working on a project right now that is very reminiscent of David Levinthal's work. I first started digitally so I could see the results. If you are interested, here is the link to the photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikezph...7622450690919/

Some people loved the color in the images, but I didn't think it was quite right, I even thought about switching to B/W. However when I brought down the saturation slider in Lightroom almost all of the way I was very pleased. Some of the images in the flickr gallery have been altered this way as well.

I typically shoot 4x5 PRO160S and print on Kodak or Fuji Matte paper (RA-4). After doing a lot of online research and calling old gurus, I was disappointed to find out that there is NO way to achieve the extremely desaturated look that I desired in the images.

After a lot of digging around I came across an old obscure thread on largeformat.info

http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ad.php?t=33452

The rest of the research I did resulted in people using B/W processing for old E6 film to achieve B/W results.

From being into C-41 and RA-4 for a little while I have come to realize most people are really into VIVID colors and that not so many people are interested in dull almost monochrome color pallets from their C-41 film and RA-4 prints.

So after visiting my local photo super store (www.uniquephoto.com) and having them give me a hard time about not knowing exactly what C-41 chemicals I needed, I was on my way with the following:

1 bottle of KODAK Flexicolor Tank Bleach SM
1 bottle of KODAK Flexicolor Fixer and Replenisher

Back at my University's lab I only had a little bit of Rodinal left so I figured I would try HC110 until I "perfected" the result. At first I was using way too much bleach, way too high development temperatures (causing HC110 to decompose I believe) and nothing was coming out, I was frustrated to say the least.

I know that sometimes people use a BLIX instead of separate bleach and fixer so I started mixing a varying amounts of bleach with fixer and started to get results! At first they were just monochrome negs with a base tint, but after finding the "right" formula I was stunned when I examined the negs with a loupe and began to see traces of color!

Here are the results from some rough scans:


Velvia 50 exposed at ISO 50
Developed in Rodinal 1:25 for 9 minutes with constant agitation
cleared with a mixture of:
.5 oz Flexicolor Tank Bleach
9.5oz Flexicolor Fixer + Replenisher solution


Velvia 50 exposed at ISO 50
developed in HC110 dilution B for 8 minutes with constant agitation
cleared with a mixture of:
.5 oz Flexicolor Tank Bleach
9.5oz Flexicolor Fixer + Replenisher solution

I am very excited with the results so far even though they are just simple test shots.

If anyone has any helpful hints or advice on why this is happening or what I can do to alter/improve the process, please let me know.