</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (docholliday @ Apr 11 2003, 02:04 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>Here one with a twist....

He was fuming. He waves the N90s in my face. "This is a PRO job, you know, I have more right than you."
That was when I went ballistic. I grabbed my Hassy, waved it in his face, and replied with a short "Mines BIGGER" (350mm lens). Then, I went back to shooting.

...hmmmm. Karma?

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"I have more rights than you" ... I damn near wet my pants reading this one.


Here&#39;s one from my "book". I don&#39;t think I&#39;ve written about this one before.

Last autumn, I set out to do an outdoor figure study, using IR film. The location was a "Reservation" - a public "wildlfe conservation" area, here in overcrowded Ipswich, Mass. We arrived early, checked out the parking lot - empty - and from where we were going to shoot we could see anyone coming in. Secure enough - or so we thought.

We started ... me firing the &#39;Blad with Konica 750 - and the model dutifully fabric-free.

After the first roll of film, or so, I heard a noise from my right - it sounded like a children&#39;s Birthday Party - voices, and party noisemakers. Nothing to be concerned about - or so I thought.

Suddenly, over a ridge to my right, STREAMED a pack of dogs - must have been fifty or sixty of them - followed by - The Fox Hunting Crowd - decked out in their jackets and tight fitting pants, blowing horns and shouting "Yoiks&#33;&#33;" or whatever it is they shout.

I dodged out of the way. The model grabbed her dress and held it tightly against herself.

The crowd thundered by - except for one mounted rider who stopped in front of me, as if to say something. Before he could, I pointed to one of the "regulation" signs, - clearly in large type -, "Absolutely NO dogs Allowed". I said, "Doesn&#39;t say anything about photography - does it?&#33;" He paused for a second or two, and said, "I won&#39;t tell if you don&#39;t". I replied, "Deal&#33;" and he rode on.

It took a few minutes to recover - and the rest of the session went well.