I know what you're talking about...I worked briefly as an assistant in a furniture studio in High Point NC (where some studios still shoot 8x10 and up for catalog work)--they owned their own lab they printed the catalogs out as color contacts on longroll printers....they had lamps that moved around to vary the intensity etc. I never paid that much attention to who actually made those printers, but I think Stoufer is about the only manufacturer left who makes contact printers. Otherwise, I have used an Arkay that had about 20 some odd lamps, all switched & filters on a roll as well as movable diffusion glass.FWIW, I have an 8x10 Burke & James Rexo that uses 9 lamps, and has two glass diffusion panels that are movable. One is frosted, the other sorta like opal glass. Then there's the glass that you lay the neg on. It has 4 movable cropping blades and a hinged platen that is switched to the safelight lamp and the whitelights as well. They're not dimmer controlled, but you can lay in sheets of acetate etc to do some dodging--or to cut back on certain areas, and you can switch each lamp on or off too. I doubled up on the thickness of the glass, and have used this mostly with the b&w duplicating film SO-132 to make contact dupes of old negatives. SO-132 has the speed of Azo, and my exposures are around 10 seconds or less with this printer. I used to print 5x7s on it using Oriental Portrait, both RC and fiber. Portrait was a slooow paper and worked great this way, but I have used Multigrade IV on it and spread out filters under the glass too...fwiw, I run it off a voltage stabilizer. I paid about $25 for it and found it in the storage room of a local store...I work next door to the state archives & they had one of these same printers for years--they surplused it. So...check your surplus lots perhaps...otherwise the Stoufer printers cost quite a bit, as a commercial lab machine. There are some photofinishing resellers, like RK Equipment (think that's right?) who may have these things used--another type of thing would be a longroll printer that worked like a 1:1 enlarger, or some sort of set size printer. I have an old Kodak lab manual someplace though, that covers contact printing, and stripping in titles etc.--it's about 1940s era, and the printers are these huge , monstrous devices with bakelite dials and platens like drymount presses....

Hope this helps--KT