Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
Dunno, the only color transparency film I've shot with pinhole was Fujichrome T64 with an 85B filter taped over the front. An equivalent exposure only about 20% longer than a test shot with a lens (same scene, same camera) produced a good exposure match.
Okay, this lines up pretty much with my experience too. To a degree though, because it does get slower exponentially the dimmer the light.


Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
The info available seems to be a little sketchy, and the tungsten films are apparently optimized for longer exposures, which worked in my favor.
Very good, then I will expose these 20 I have in the freezer in readyloads next and save the daylight film for my Cambo this next time around. I'm really thinking of ending the affair with Ektachrome soon as I am out of my stock which is only 30 sheets. I'm going back to Astia.

Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
With multiple failures, I'm inclined to wonder if your calculated f-stop might be off -- it wouldn't take much of an error in that pinhole diameter measurement to throw things off quite a bit.
Well, I used the specifications provided by Zero Image on this camera. I shot all my past Ektachrome on another pinhole camera that I found out to be really umm.. sub-par. I am confident that my calculations are correct because I am getting better results now than ever before. However, understanding the incremental nature of adjusting for exposure variations can become a rather expensive proposition these days which is why I am asking for someone to share what worked for them so I can cut down on my loss of $'s at a time when I am ramping up to quit the day job and go travel nonstop for photographic purposes. Anyway, I am inclined at this point to believe that Ektachrome is slightly unpredictable in general from one emulsion to another perhaps, and, that the curve may be more of a set of stairs rather than an incline.